Here’s Why Pilots Say “Roger That”

Communication is key, especially in aviation. It can be used to warn someone of danger and achieve goals as a team. It can also be used to help avoid huge disasters and call for help in dire circumstances. If you’ve ever seen a military-related movie or television show, you may have noticed pilots talking over [...]

By |February 12th, 2018|Aviation History|0 Comments

Pilot Profile: Albert Ball

Britain’s first great ace Albert Ball was a sensational World War I fighter pilot who made history at a young age. Ball was born August 14, 1896 in Nottingham, England to Sir Albert Ball and Harriett Mary page. He enjoyed learning about engines and electrical equipment as a child and had an impressive aim when shooting [...]

By |February 2nd, 2018|Pilot Profile|0 Comments

Eddie Rickenbacker: Ace of Aces, Race Car Driver, Air Transportation Pioneer

Not every fighter pilot was considered an ace during World War I, let alone the ace of aces. But for Eddie Rickenbacker, that’s precisely what he was. An Early Life (With a Purpose) Edward Vernon Rickenbacker was born on October 8, 1890 in Columbus, Ohio. His parents were German-speaking Swiss immigrants and he was the [...]

By |January 19th, 2018|Pilot Profile|Comments Off on Eddie Rickenbacker: Ace of Aces, Race Car Driver, Air Transportation Pioneer

Pilot Profile: Katherine Stinson

A Pioneering American Aviator As one of America's Early aviators, Katherine Stinson set numerous flying records, including ones for distance, endurance, and aerobatic maneuvers. In July 1912, she became the fourth woman in the United States to obtain a pilot’s certificate. Katherine Stinson was born in Fort Payne, Alabama, on February 14, 1891. It would be twelve [...]

By |December 8th, 2017|Aviation History|Comments Off on Pilot Profile: Katherine Stinson

The Everett Factory and the Rise of the Boeing 747

Labor Day marks the unofficial end to summer and is one of the busiest times to travel. As you gaze out onto the tarmac at the massive Boeing 747 you're going to board, take a moment to reflect on the wonder of the man-made flying machine and how it's about to carry over 500 people [...]

By |September 4th, 2017|General Aviation|Comments Off on The Everett Factory and the Rise of the Boeing 747

From Off the Ground to Out of this World: The Beginnings of NASA

Long before Neil Armstrong made one giant leap for mankind (or, you know, didn’t, if that’s your belief), NASA’s work was a lot closer to home. In fact, it had nothing to do with aerospace at all. At least, not technically. The NASA we know and love today grew out of a federal agency founded [...]

By |July 17th, 2017|General Aviation|Comments Off on From Off the Ground to Out of this World: The Beginnings of NASA

Plane of the Week: Junkers F.13

In a world of fabric-and-wood, be metal. Hugo Junkers (1859-1935)©MP/Leemage The Junkers F.13 was one of the most advanced aircraft of its time. Developed in Germany at the end of WWI, this advanced cantilever-wing monoplane was the first ever all-metal transport aircraft. It was also Junker's first commercial aircraft--not too shabby considering they would go [...]

By |March 24th, 2017|Plane Of The Week|Comments Off on Plane of the Week: Junkers F.13

Plane of the Week: The Red Baron’s Fokker Dr.I

The Fokker Dr.I triplane was introduced in 1917 by Dutch aircraft manufacturer, Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. The WWI fighter aircraft saw widespread service in the spring of 1918. The Fokker Dr.I became famous through Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (the Red Baron), who used it during his last 19 victories. It was also the aircraft in which he was killed on [...]

By |December 2nd, 2016|Plane Of The Week|Comments Off on Plane of the Week: The Red Baron’s Fokker Dr.I

The History of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Part 2: Interwar Years & WWII

To read The History of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Part 1: WWI, click here.  Post-WWI: Target and Assault Drones Interwar Years After World War I, the aviation industry advanced exponentially. These advancements (particularly within the air transport sector) hindered the testing and operation of unmanned systems. As post-war hostilities decreased, so did military interest in unmanned flight; [...]

By |November 23rd, 2016|Aviation History|Comments Off on The History of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Part 2: Interwar Years & WWII

A Brief History of Early Aerial Warfare

It might seem reasonable to assume that aerial warfare didn’t begin until the 20th century—after all, that’s when the Wright Bros invented and flew the first successful airplane (The Wright Flyer). In a way, this is completely valid. However, technically speaking, the history of aerial warfare is an ancient one. Lowe in his balloon "Intrepid" on [...]

By |October 24th, 2016|Aviation History|Comments Off on A Brief History of Early Aerial Warfare